[[ READ KINDLE ]] ☠ There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack ⇚ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

The parts about music went over my head There s a core here that really resonates and stays relevant particularly worth thinking about post Windrush scandal and some of it could have used a much stronger attention to issues of gender Perhaps my reading is hopelessly asynchronous I come to the book with knowledge of the interventions feminism has made in the field of culture studies, and wish the author had known of texts that came after him Or perhaps the gaps are still gaps. [[ READ KINDLE ]] ⇰ There Ain't No Black in the Union Jack ☟ This classic book is a powerful indictment of contemporary attitudes to race By accusing British intellectuals and politicians on both sides of the political divide of refusing to take race seriously, Paul Gilroy caused immediate uproar when this book was first published inA brilliant and explosive exploration of racial discourses, There Ain t No Black in the Union Jack provided a powerful new direction for race relations in Britain Still dynamite today and as relevant as ever, this Routledge Classics edition includes a new introduction by the author Some theoretical nuggets of value but overburdened by extraneous detail The entire chapter on music could have been cut to make a tighter and 70 page shorter book were it not for the fact that this is the author s pet interest. At first I found the book very hard going, as he uses quite difficult language and concepts.But I kept going and started to enjoy it even it I didn t agree 100% on all his political points It was insightful and it almost felt as if you were there in the movement itself However, I was hit by the last chapter He seems to completely to completely change his position on the question of class and race, and starts using social movement theories which don t really explain anything in my opinion At first I found the book very hard going, as he uses quite difficult language and concepts.But I kept going and started to enjoy it even it I didn t agree 100% on all his political points It was insightful and it almost felt as if you were there in the movement itself However, I was hit by the last chapter He seems to completely to completely change his position on the question of class and race, and starts using social movement theories which don t really explain anything in my opinion I would recommend giving it a read if you have the time, as most of the book is good, and he presents an important and under written about history of the 70s and 80s, but I really didn t think much of his conclusions This was an incredibly interesting and thoroughly researched overview of race relations in the UK in the age of immigration I hadn t read such a heavy and detailed book on the subject before so it took me a while to get to grips with it the first chapter especially is incredibly laden with terminology that is fairly difficult to understand, with many sentences requiring rereading but Gilroy finds acompelling voice later in the book The 3rd and 4th chapters are especially interesting, This was an incredibly interesting and thoroughly researched overview of race relations in the UK in the age of immigration I hadn t read such a heavy and detailed book on the subject before so it took me a while to get to grips with it the first chapter especially is incredibly laden with terminology that is fairly difficult to understand, with many sentences requiring rereading but Gilroy finds acompelling voice later in the book The 3rd and 4th chapters are especially interesting, respectively giving a view of relations between the police and migrant communities and their representation in wider culture and media, and a history of anti racist movements in recent years both from a popular and governmental direction The 5th chapter focusing on the expression of black culture through music is not as evidently relevant to begin with, but the greater themes Gilroy draws on in this section givecontext to the points he is trying to make about the unique nature of race as a social qualifier in regards to class and other distinctions A truly excellent exploration of black culture both inside the UK and out, with some detailed history of which I was previously not aware Would recommend highly Paul Gilroy offers a fluent account of race and racism in Britain from the 1950s until the 1987, taking into account historical influences, political strategies, modes of representation in media, and by figures of authority both police and politicians and capitalist logic, albeit from a rather Marxist perspective This book is an eye opener into understanding British policies of race , and trying to combat them. Man, do I wish I d have had the time to give this book the full attention it deserves I read skimmed it for a class project Paul Gilroy is now one of my new favorite scholars He writes so clearly and with such passion and everything he says makes so much sense I wish I could have devoted the entire project to just his work in cultural studies. Gilroy demonstrates the enormous complexity of racial politics in England today Exploring the relationships among race, class, and nation as they have evolved over the past twenty years, he highlights racist attitudes that transcend the left right political divide He challenges current sociological approaches to racism as well as the ethnocentric bias of British cultural studies. An absorbing read with interesting, well executed analysis about race relations You might not agree with some of the authors assumptions or perspectives, but the author is very persuasive With a revised introduction So the copy I had out from the library had so much writing and underlining in a variety of colors I couldn t really manage to get through all of this, and after the intro and first chapter, skipped to the conclusion Maybe if I get my hands on another copy I ll get through the rest.