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DOWNLOAD ⚺ Shadow Box Ù Climbing into the ring with former light heavy weight champion Archie Moore I cannot think of any other book that I ve deliberately delayed finishing Plimpton s writing is delightful, and it s clear that he enjoys participating in the subject he covers Anyone interested in the major heavyweight boxers of the past half century Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, George Foreman, etc as well as American writers will enjoy Beyond a book about sports, Plimpton s meditations on life, death, and the role of writers in society are worth the read. From A Poem on the Annihilation of Ernie Terrell by Muhammad Ali and Marianne Moore.He is claiming to be the real heavyweight champBut when the fight starts he will look like a trampHe has been talking too much about me and making me soreAfter I am through with him he will not be able to challenge Mrs Moore George Plimpton s classic of participatory journalism, Shadow box, has recently come back in print In the wake of Muhammad Ali s recent death, Plimpton s boxing tome takes on an e From A Poem on the Annihilation of Ernie Terrell by Muhammad Ali and Marianne Moore.He is claiming to be the real heavyweight champBut when the fight starts he will look like a trampHe has been talking too much about me and making me soreAfter I am through with him he will not be able to challenge Mrs Moore George Plimpton s classic of participatory journalism, Shadow box, has recently come back in print In the wake of Muhammad Ali s recent death, Plimpton s boxing tome takes on an extra poignancy Plimpton s foray into boxing begins with a pathetic three round bout against Archie Moore, the former light heavyweight champion of the world, in a New York boxing gym Plimpton is pummeled mercilessly by the champ After the fight, Plimpton decides to spend the rest of his pugilistic journalism career on the other side of the ropes Plimpton recounts meetings with two literary boxing aficionados, Ernest Hemingway and Norman Mailer Recalling a visit to Hemingway in Key West with Tennessee Williams, Plimpton is taken by Hemingway s notorious belligerence Plimpton discusses Norman Mailer s regular two minute sparring sessions with light heavyweight champion Jose Torres Both celebrity authors tried to create an aura of machismo with their boxing exploits The second half of Shadow box is primarily about the rise of Muhammad Ali on the boxing landscape Plimpton covered the first fight with Sonny Liston in 1964, when the scrappy, histrionic Ali then known as Cassius Clay was given no chance by established sports writers against the stoic, bruiser Liston Liston quit after six rounds, and Ali became the heavyweight champion of the world In 1967, Plimpton arranged a meeting with the poet Marianne Moore and Ali at the New York saloon, Toots Shor s , and the two masters of verbal communication composed a sonnet together Moore was overwhelmed by the social adeptness of the champ, and they quickly became friends In the late 1960s, George Plimpton defended Muhammad Ali against charges of draft dodging, and covered his first comeback fight in 1970 after his boxing suspension was lifted Ali was later vindicated by the US Supreme Court when his draft refusal conviction was overturned on religious grounds Plimpton was in New York for the epic Ali Frazier bout in 1971, a rare loss for The Greatest of All Time Ali beat the odds again in 1974, reclaiming his heavyweight championship against the heavier George Foreman by using the rope a dope strategy Plimpton, along with Mailer and Hunter S Thompson, was in Kinshasa, Zaire for two months covering the fight Ali was still the heavyweight champion of the world when the book went to press in 1977.Reviewed by David B., Librarian, InfoNow A now funny, now poignant, now breathtaking book, less about boxing in itself than about boxing as a lens through which to view the world Here s the book in Plimpton s own words What do you want to know such things for he asked I thought you were writing a book about boxing I am, I replied But a lot of other stuff seems to creep in It s mostly about people taking matters into their own hands gangsters, mercenaries, jealous lovers, outraged wrtiers I ve developed a near vigilante, A now funny, now poignant, now breathtaking book, less about boxing in itself than about boxing as a lens through which to view the world Here s the book in Plimpton s own words What do you want to know such things for he asked I thought you were writing a book about boxing I am, I replied But a lot of other stuff seems to creep in It s mostly about people taking matters into their own hands gangsters, mercenaries, jealous lovers, outraged wrtiers I ve developed a near vigilante, antibureaucratic attitude I don t like at all Maybe it has to do with how ineffectual we were with Ali when he had his title removed those feeble efforts we made, as custodians, to press for his rights And what does that have to do with death fancies Peter asked.Read for the portraits of Ali and Bundini Brown, and Hemmingway, Marianne Moore Read also for the shocking cameos of Plimpton s own absurd upper class existence, which he doesn t flaunt so much as doesn t excuse or apologize for the way a modern writer would That feels refreshing.Also, if you re looking for a book with charm this is the one Plimpton s a great, wry, cheerful, honest guide, and he brings us on a slow associative journey, rather than a Gripping Narrative Rollercoaster of Journalistic THRILLS I love it for that unapologetic loping pace, and for the care he s taken A book to savor before bed A great author on any subject in the mould of George Orwell , George Plimpton, editor of the Paris Review, takes us into the world of professional boxing His first foray is an exercise in participatory journalism , in which he organizes a fight between himself and Archie Moore, then Light Heavyweight champion of the world For most of the book, however, Plimpton follows Muhammed Ali through some of the most significant events of his career the defeat of Sonny Liston, the loss of his title ov A great author on any subject in the mould of George Orwell , George Plimpton, editor of the Paris Review, takes us into the world of professional boxing His first foray is an exercise in participatory journalism , in which he organizes a fight between himself and Archie Moore, then Light Heavyweight champion of the world For most of the book, however, Plimpton follows Muhammed Ali through some of the most significant events of his career the defeat of Sonny Liston, the loss of his title over the controversy surrounding refusing to be drafted to fight in Vietnam, and, over many chapters, the Rumble in the Jungle fight against George Foreman in Zaire Along the way we encounter many of the greats of the boxing world of that era But, in what makes this book truly unique, we also encounter the likes of Ernest Hemingway, Marianne Moore, and Norman Mailer Shadow Box is literary sportswriting unlike anything else I have ever read I thought you were writing a book about boxing I am, I replied But a lot of other stuff seems to creep in