[Read Kindle] ⚫ How to Be an Existentialist: or How to Get Real, Get a Grip and Stop Making Excuses ⚞ eBook or Kindle ePUB free

[Read Kindle] ⚢ How to Be an Existentialist: or How to Get Real, Get a Grip and Stop Making Excuses ⛓ How to Be an Existentialist is a witty and entertaining book about the philosophy of existentialism It is also a genuine self help book offering clear advice on how to live according to the principles of existentialism formulated by Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, and the other great existentialist philosophers An attack on contemporary excuse culture, the book urges us to face the hard existential truths of the human condition By revealing that we are all inescapably free and responsible condemned to be free, as Sartre says the book aims to empower the reader with a sharp sense that we are each the master of our own destiny Cox makes fun of the reputation existentialism has for being gloomy and pessimistic, exposing it for what it really is an honest, uplifting, and potentially life changing philosophy A beautiful book that shares the fundamental ideas of Existentialism and teaches us how to be one Very enjoyable read, Gary Cox is a witty writer indeed Highly recommended for those interested in Existentialism or what to get real in life. This is a weird little book that does a middling job fulfilling its two distinct aims It is neither an excellent theoretical introduction to existentialism for the uninitiated nor a practical manual that actually lays out a distinct method for implementing existentialism towards living a better life The book adopts a hip, irreverent style and the discussion is interspersed with ironic asides presumably all to draw in the non specialist reader and put him at ease with the weighty concepts Ho This is a weird little book that does a middling job fulfilling its two distinct aims It is neither an excellent theoretical introduction to existentialism for the uninitiated nor a practical manual that actually lays out a distinct method for implementing existentialism towards living a better life The book adopts a hip, irreverent style and the discussion is interspersed with ironic asides presumably all to draw in the non specialist reader and put him at ease with the weighty concepts However, all this bravado of attitude is incidental, and rarely of any use to understanding the difficult concepts Cox s descriptions of the philosophy itself often fails to escape the circularity of jargon to which so much philosophical writing is prone, and one is left with grand exhortations and attitude ironically, this little book that purports to emancipate the reader from bad faith seems better designed to encourage the smug self satisfaction of the sardonic fleeting dabbler in esoterica How could that not be bad faith As a general introduction to existentialism, it is merely passably good It is good insofar as Cox narrows in on the most useful and fundamental concepts bad faith, authenticity, being situation, being towards death, eternal recurrence It is unsatisfying insofar as it purports to ground explanation of these crucial principles in a basic description of existentialism, its method, ontology and so forth As a reader who has already read a bit of Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus and Merleu Ponty not to mention Dostoevsky and Flaubert who figure prominently here , I found many parts of the book to be a decent synthesis of concepts I already knew For example, Cox s makes a crucial between authenticity the audacious crafting of one s own meaning from recognition of the underlying meaninglessness of life and sincerity a form of bad faith that consists of convincing oneself of the solidity and necessity of certain aspects of one s phenomenal context His discussion of Nietzsche and Heidegger in relation to authenticity are mercifully clear On the other hand, he could have gone so much further in writing a clear guide to the difference between bad faith and authenticity We all must agree that Heidegger was a Nazi and that Nazis are bad But why does it follow that Heidegger s adherence to national socialism was a form of bad faith Is every membership in a group inauthentic Must the true existentialist disavow any affiliation with a political cause insofar as this involves alignment with an external purpose Cox joins in the universal denunciation of Heidegger without really explaining why in relation to his central narrative And what about the self help part of the book This seems mostly bravado Cox repeats the assertions of existentialists that belief in existentialist principles and the struggle to be authentic can lead to true emancipation He tells us about the existence of existential counseling and that it improves on typical psychoanalysis by acknowledging anxiety as a fundamental reasoned reaction to the meaninglessness of existence However, Cox doesn t actually tell us anything about HOW to build from that realization towards arobust and healthy perspective He provides no method, only madness.I certainly got something out of this as somewhat of a specialist, but I can t recommend it to anyone looking for a first introduction to existentialism Nor can I recommend it to anyone looking for a way to apply existentialism to liberate his or her consciousness Perhaps you should try Buddhism, which, in some its recent adaptations seems to be a form of existentialism coupled with method I would recommend this book to anyone who has a basic ability to grasp abstract concepts Overall, it approaches its point with a direct simplicity, not over saturating the concept with muddling jargon and academic posturing There is a bit in the middle when I started to feel a bit over my head once he starts in with the facticity s but it quickly passed It is short enough not to seem daunting, as many philosophers are dreadfully verbose, taking three pages to say what might be said in one I would recommend this book to anyone who has a basic ability to grasp abstract concepts Overall, it approaches its point with a direct simplicity, not over saturating the concept with muddling jargon and academic posturing There is a bit in the middle when I started to feel a bit over my head once he starts in with the facticity s but it quickly passed It is short enough not to seem daunting, as many philosophers are dreadfully verbose, taking three pages to say what might be said in one I would recommend reading it with a highlighter pen, as there are many ahas to be found, even if you want nothingthan to understand what existentialists believe My main criticism would be that Cox, who has spent much of his life studying Sartre, is willing, although slightly hesitant, to stray outside of this prominent existentialist s body of work To me it seemslike Cox feels Sartre is all one needs,than being ignorant of what others have said That may be true, but I felt a little force fed regarding so much from one existentialist philosopher.I may read it again in a while During my first phenomenology course at the University of Heidelberg, I almost gave up the idea to continue my studies of philosophy I did not understand a single word as the professor started to talk about the two heavy weights Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger and their concepts of Dasein German for being there The term refers to a person s unique spatial and temporal situated ness in this world , I remember him saying I was too scared to ask, what the heck this was supposed to me During my first phenomenology course at the University of Heidelberg, I almost gave up the idea to continue my studies of philosophy I did not understand a single word as the professor started to talk about the two heavy weights Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger and their concepts of Dasein German for being there The term refers to a person s unique spatial and temporal situated ness in this world , I remember him saying I was too scared to ask, what the heck this was supposed to mean Most of the other students, however, clicking their tongues due to this epiphanic realization, seemed to get it immediately I only developed the concept of not being there in this unique spatial and temporal classroom Why did this handsome post graduate, writing his PhD on Satre, tell me a clueless undergraduate, after a couple glasses of red wine , that, if i really want to dive into Satre s world, I have to understand his predecessors For me, existentialism so far, only meant to wear black dresses, drinking tons of coffee and or wine and smoking in caf s while writing smart things on tissue papers And I was quite happy with that concept existential philosophy as a vivid, practical and hip lifestyle a way of being I could easily relate to Why change something that is already as good as it is Well, because after a few days of drinking too much black coffee and smoking too many heavy cigarettes, my body seriously complained Hence, I started studying, reading up, whatever I could get into my hands, to understandand also impress the PhD guy at the next discussion round Long and lonely nights in the library were following Me vs Satre Everyone, who has been busily engaged in studying philosophy, knows that kind of feeling I really wanted to crack the nut Because I figured out that the ideas behind existentialism can be quite explosive Sentences like We are all free and can t stop being free or Existentialists recognize that life is ultimately absurd and full of terrible, inescapable truths shook me up But to tell you the truth if Gary Cox s book How to Be an Existentialist would have been out there already, it would have enlightened my mind and hence, saved precious life time How to Be an Existentialist is a concise and clearly entertaining introduction into the philosophy of existentialism, nicely explaining much worried about notions such as authenticity or bad faith The long and well written chapters on What is existentialism and How not be an existentialist accompany the curious reader through concepts, including true to life examples The following chapter How to be authentic focuses on the acceptance of how things really are Authenticity involves a person confronting reality and facing up the hard truth that he is at all times a free being This is where Cox makes fun of the reputation existentialism has for being gloomy and pessimistic, exposing it for what it really is an honest, uplifting and potentially life changing philosophy With the publication of How to Be an Existentialist , Gary Cox qualified as Britain s new pop philospher , as the book has a slightly light, but definitely witty touch On the other hand, Cox s aim is to jolt the I blame everyone but myself society, where it became fashionable and so easy for all of us to not take over responsibility for our own and freely chosen actions Hence, he chose to bridge the gap between the academic ivory tower research and the worldly needs of an interested but theoretically untrained reader In an age where philosophy is simply regarded as an academic subject alongside other academic subjects, the claim that profound personal enlightenment can result from the study of philosophy sounds grandiose According to the Ancient Greek founders of Western philosophy, however, achieving personal enlightenment is precisely the point of studying philosophy The trouble with too many philosophy students and teachers is that they think the point of studying philosophy is to get a degree and to hell with enlightenment page 94 Branding his work as self help literature surely helps to catch some of the lost souls roaming around in book stores, searching for alternatives to How to life my life for Dummies And Cox is not be blamed for it such a substantial and entertaining introduction to existentialism, which also makes you chuckle and that s quite rare in philosophy, believe me , deserves a place even in your library