|FREE EBOOK ⚖ Magic Is Dead: My Journey Into the World's Most Secretive Society of Magicians ☤ eBooks or Kindle ePUB free

Abandoned Promises intrigue but immediately devolves into descriptions of videos and the writer s acquaintance with celebrity.The tone here is like my 11 year old trying to interest me in his latest hobby. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Judging from the title you would think that this is a truly groundbreaking take on the current state of the magic scene but that isn t the case It s nothingthan a misguided desire on the part of a group of young misfits trying to make the case that they ve outdone their predecessors with their artistic sleight of hand card handling techniques The story centers on a cast of characters you ve likely never heard of before unless you rely on You Tube and Instagram for your news One by one Judging from the title you would think that this is a truly groundbreaking take on the current state of the magic scene but that isn t the case It s nothingthan a misguided desire on the part of a group of young misfits trying to make the case that they ve outdone their predecessors with their artistic sleight of hand card handling techniques The story centers on a cast of characters you ve likely never heard of before unless you rely on You Tube and Instagram for your news One by one they re invited to join the mysterious group known as The52 and get yet another tattoo this time with the card corresponding to their assigned card in a deck of playing cards on their middle finger Misfits and F ups all missing fathers, drug and alcohol addictions, suicide etc it s magic that draws them together into this cabal of irregulars In fact, they re no different than the card cheats and sleight of hand artists they learned their techniques from, the ones they re seeking to dethrone In the end, The52 begun by Daniel Madison and Laura London is as meaningless as The Sons of Lee Marvin cult started by Jim Jarmusch with charter members Tom Waits, Nick Cave and John Lurie, merely a curiosity The description is super misleading The book is somewhere between autobiography and just random stories over the course of a year for some guy and his magician friends The World s Most Secretive Magic Group or whatever is never explained, only just who is in it whichseems not so secretive.The writing was poor, and the story telling was awkward Most had to do with other magicians validating the author s attempts at magic It was just a really jumbled, cringey book. I debated about whether this book should be 3 or 2 stars, but ultimately remembered that Frisch is a journalist, so the bar is understandably higher, and his writing just didn t live up to expectations I lost track of the number of times he said over and had people saying, Duuuude to his various tricks.As other reviewers have noted, the biggest flaw of the book is that it neither addressed the World s Most Secretive Society of Magicians, and it really never explains how Ian got the ini I debated about whether this book should be 3 or 2 stars, but ultimately remembered that Frisch is a journalist, so the bar is understandably higher, and his writing just didn t live up to expectations I lost track of the number of times he said over and had people saying, Duuuude to his various tricks.As other reviewers have noted, the biggest flaw of the book is that it neither addressed the World s Most Secretive Society of Magicians, and it really never explains how Ian got the initial invite into the society Don t get me wrong, he discusses the moment, but really never explains to the reader how he got into their good graces in the first place He didn t become a magician really until after he was inducted into the group The only hints we get are the repeated claims of Madison and others, Don t forget dude, you re playing an important role in this group, you re just as important as anyone else, you can tell our story Never mind that this story is one they don t want told, in order to maintain the status of a secretive society.I hate to even say this, but I am just going to say it anyway.given the premise of Frisch tragically losing his dad at 13, and the understandable emotional scaring that was left from that, this book really feels like Frisch seeking the approval that he can t seek from his father Most of the book is the magicians he encounters being stunned and amazed by his beginning tricks Not that I don t believe this really happened, but it just felt cringy and ultimately the book lacked a large amount of substance Nothing really ever develops, we are just taken from scene to scene of Frisch fan girling over magicians, them showering him with praise, and him explaining his first few tricks he learned.However, I will say I enjoyed the ending, which involved an exchange with a homeless person That part was a gem.but I wouldn t say the book in its entirety was a gem Really not a good book This book is contrived, meandering, disjointed, and very poorly researched The author keeps mentioning that as a journalist he is a storyteller, but sadly he s terrible at this, his stories all basically boil down to either all his new friends are fantastic, or pointless stuff about his childhood He also frequently contradicts himself, for example, he chastises Houdini for being a terrible card magician, then just a page or two later says that Dai Vernon must have been Really not a good book This book is contrived, meandering, disjointed, and very poorly researched The author keeps mentioning that as a journalist he is a storyteller, but sadly he s terrible at this, his stories all basically boil down to either all his new friends are fantastic, or pointless stuff about his childhood He also frequently contradicts himself, for example, he chastises Houdini for being a terrible card magician, then just a page or two later says that Dai Vernon must have been an amazing magician because he managed to fool Houdini with a card trick He also frequently gets dates, or the order of famous magic events in the wrong order and even gets the nationality of famous magicians wrong I would have given up long before reaching the end of the book, but I found it fascinating to see what he was going to get wrong next If you want a book about the author being in love with Daniel Madison and Chris Ramsay, this is totally the book for you, however, if you want a book about magic, look elsewhere I m not the biggest fan of non fiction, so to be completely honest, I didn t know if I was going to like this or not BUT surprisingly, I really enjoyed reading this book It was captivating from the beginning, and I really loved the narration style Since I was little, I ve always been interested in magic however, I did have a specific stereotype attached to the term magician This book helped me think of the magic industry in a way I ve never thought about before and brought to my attention I m not the biggest fan of non fiction, so to be completely honest, I didn t know if I was going to like this or not BUT surprisingly, I really enjoyed reading this book It was captivating from the beginning, and I really loved the narration style Since I was little, I ve always been interested in magic however, I did have a specific stereotype attached to the term magician This book helped me think of the magic industry in a way I ve never thought about before and brought to my attention a lot of things I never would have considered otherwise This book talks about how the emergence of social media and popularity of platforms such as Instagram and YouTube changed the way magic is both performed and received.The only reason I didn t give this book 5 stars is because there were some parts I skimmed over But overall, I think everyone can find something that they like about this book |FREE EBOOK ☰ Magic Is Dead: My Journey Into the World's Most Secretive Society of Magicians ♎ In the vein of Neil Strauss The Game and Joshua Foer s Moonwalking with Einstein comes the fascinating story of one man s colorful, mysterious, and personal journey into the world of magic, and his unlikely invitation into a secret underground society of revolutionary illusionists from around the world Magic Is Dead is Ian Frisch s head first dive into a hidden world full of extraordinary characters and highly guarded secrets It is a story of imagination, deception, and art that spotlights today s most brilliant young magicians a mysterious society known as the, who are revolutionizing an ancient artform under the mantra Magic Is DeadIan brings us with him as he not only gets to know this fascinating world, but also becomes an integral part of it We meet the s founding members Chris Ramsay, Laura London, and Daniel Madison and explore their personal demons, professional aspirations, and what drew them to their art We join them at private gatherings of the most extraordinary magicians working today, follow them to magic conventions in Las Vegas and London, and discover some of the best tricks of the trade We also encounter David Blaine, a close friend of Madison s hang out with Penn Jillette and meet Dynamo, the UK s most famous magician Magic Is Dead is also a chronicle of magic s rich history and how it has changed in the internet age, as the young guns moves away from the old school take on the craftAs he tells the story of the, and his role as its most unlikely member, Ian reveals his own connection with trickery and deceit, how he first learned the elements that make magic work from his poker playing mother, and recalls their adventures in card rooms and casinos after his father s sudden death Magic the romanticism of the inexplicable, the awe and admiration of the unexpected is an underlying force in how we view the world and its myriad possibilities, Ian writes As his journey continues, Ian not only becomes a performer and creator of magic, he also cements a new brotherhood, and begins to understand his relationship with his father, fifteen years after his death Written with psychological acuity and a keen eye for detail, Magic Is Dead is an engrossing tale full of wonder and surprise A cool peak behind the curtain at Magic s young guns blazing a new trail for magicians As a bonus we get to see the secrets behind some of the tricks and the process of what goes into creating an original one A fascinating read for anyone with the smallest amount of interest in magic or who still has that childlike sense of wonder about the world. This is an interesting blend between a journalist s experience getting close to the young magic community and memoir exploring Frisch s father s death and his mother s poker habits I can t lie, I teared up a few times. Short version Don t be fooled by the book s cool cover art or jacket description There s no mystery, just name dropping.I don t know if the author, editor, or publisher is to blame for presenting the book as a look inside the52, a secret society of the most innovative performers and creators of illusion, deception, and mystery That would be an interesting book, but that s not what the actual book is about, and the52 goes unmentioned for whole chapters.Basically, the journalist Ian Frisch ma Short version Don t be fooled by the book s cool cover art or jacket description There s no mystery, just name dropping.I don t know if the author, editor, or publisher is to blame for presenting the book as a look inside the52, a secret society of the most innovative performers and creators of illusion, deception, and mystery That would be an interesting book, but that s not what the actual book is about, and the52 goes unmentioned for whole chapters.Basically, the journalist Ian Frisch makes friends with some very successful YouTube Instagram magicians He s smitten with them, and the luster never wears off, so the bulk of the book is Ian s descriptions of just how freakin cool these famous and successful people are.There s no twist, no reveal I was expecting something like the documentary Exit Through the Gift Shop, where the viewer realizes partway through that the filmmaker is not in control of what s happening Nope Then I was at least hoping for some immersion journalism in which the writer shows us a little known subculture from the inside but then brings some critical perspective Again, no It slike I always suspected magicians were cool, but now I know THEY ARE SUPER COOL and I m finally one of them Although I still look down on the majority of magicians as lame That s the other thing Over and over and over his friends as described as young guns, the new generation, shaking up the establishment, etc They ridicule the stodgy oldtimers But after finishing the book I still don t know what they re trying to get away from Top hats and rabbits Their only genuinely new thing seems to be using social media and personal branding OK, fine, those are relatively new concepts, but they simply didn t exist for previous generations so I don t see the substantive difference between old and new.Here are two quotations that show the narrator s unreliability but not the entertaining kind of unreliable narrator 1 Early in the book, when he s just being introduced to famous magicians, he writes I had only heard whispers about the52 Ramsay, right before I came to Blackpool, had cryptically mentioned it a secret society, founded by Laura London and Daniel Madison, comprising the world s most prominent young magicians, all of whom were pushing the craft forward and doing truly unique things Those are not cryptic whispers That s a complete and through description The only twist we learn later in the book is that it s not really a secret society, since members post photos of their induction tattoos on Instagram.2 Later, at a magic convention in Buffalo, he attempts to contrast the oldtimers with the brash young innovators The older guys mostly kept to themselves, rehashing experiences from memories past or immodestly showing each other moves that had been invented decades ago Literally two sentences later Xavior a member of the52 held court at a corner table and showed a small crowd his work on Raise Rise, an effect invented and made famous back in the 1990s, i.e decades ago.Frisch includes chapters about his childhood and parents, which are actually quite touching and subtle I don t think his personal story arc complements or resonates with the main themes of magic as much as he thinks it does Other chapters on the history of magic are interesting but that topic has been covered better elsewhere