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READ PDF æ Il Monte Analogo î Un gruppo di singolari ed esperti alpinisti, certi dell esistenza, in qualche parte del globo, di una montagna la cui vetta pi alta di tutte le vette, decide un giorno di partire da Parigi per tentare di scoprirla e di darne la scalata Dopo una navigazione non euclidea , a bordo di un imbarcazione chiamata l Impossibile , gli esploratori approdano nell isola continente del Monte Analogo , dove trovano una popolazione, dagli usi apparentemente stravaganti, che discende da uomini di tutti i tempi e che, come loro, vive ormai, soltanto, nella speranza di scalare la vetta Un breve soggiorno nel villaggio di Porto delle Scimmie, e il gruppo dei nostri alpinisti intraprende l ascensione, arrivando in vista del campo base A questo punto il racconto s interrompe siamo soltanto all inizio di un viaggio che forse sempre, continuamente, all inizio quando la morte coglie Ren Daumal, l autore di questa storia, impedendogli di descrivere il seguito della scalata al monte simbolico che unisce la Terra al CieloSotto le parvenze di un romanzo d avventure, o di un racconto fantastico, Il Monte Analogo , pubblicato postumo nel , ci offre una metafisica dell alpinismo che , anche, un itinerario minuzioso, lentamente maturato nelle esperienze dell autore, verso un centro, sentito come liberazione della persona da ogni suo limite, verso una vetta in cui, al disopra di ogni specifica contraddizione, ciascun uomo attui le proprie umane possibilit Con la leggerezza propria del saggio, facendo uso nel racconto di storie, canzoni, deduzioni, miti e dimostrazioni, Daumal trasporta il lettore nel regno dell analogia, dove niente vero ma tutto veridico, per un parallelismo tra realt raggiunta e realt raggiungibile attraverso un metodo cio il mettersi sulla via che fa cadere i nostri schemi difensivi e ci porta a contemplare con occhi nuovi il nostro paesaggio interiore A handbook on how to write convincingly about fantastical scenarios Lost fans will find some startling familiarities here and Calvino fans will appreciate the ingenious structure that marries invented mythology and adventure story Daumel died before he could finish, but what exists isthan worthwhile His notes suggest allegory was going to surface in the final chapters, so maybe the unresolved ending is preferable It s a miracle that this book even exists A book we were never meant to have, existing only in myth A fever of a dream, but with all the details intact, specific, and so real Like ending up in a dream without leaving the real world behind, both in terms of the trivialities of living as well as the logic that never approaches dream logic An amalgamation of science, philosophy, myth, humor, and clear thinking, yes with the translucent, almost invisible, clarity of a paradam that suddenly ben It s a miracle that this book even exists A book we were never meant to have, existing only in myth A fever of a dream, but with all the details intact, specific, and so real Like ending up in a dream without leaving the real world behind, both in terms of the trivialities of living as well as the logic that never approaches dream logic An amalgamation of science, philosophy, myth, humor, and clear thinking, yes with the translucent, almost invisible, clarity of a paradam that suddenly bends your thinking around its curvature A paradam shift This book was already written from another world, no wonder Daumal died mid sentence No wonder He was a dead man when he began, only gracing us with a few words from the other side And how fitting This story of a journey to the other side, a journey that never reaches its destination because its author, having reached it, cannot come back to tell us but a few details that might lead us there An impossible journey Mount Analogue is analogous of itself, without ever being self reflexive, without even knowing its antecedent The unknown, like a dagger in the known, is deceptively accessible Nevertheless, Daumal prepares the way, like the campers before him In Daumal s world, the mystery of the unknown isreal than the reality of the world, so that our reality is but a dream within it It s a transcendence into specificity When we look back from the other world, we ll see but a vagueness reminiscent of lives half lived in the fog that hovers in the foothills.PS reading some of the other reviews, I was a little annoyed that a few people had mentioned that this was surrealism No it s not People like to repeat what other people say without really evaluating it Why would Daumal delve into surrealism when he can end up in the ideal territory of surrealism without ever leaving the real That is what Daumal does, and that is why it is brilliant beyond anything I ve ever imagined could be written One logical step at a time, is how Daumal leads us up the mountain I am convinced that some books have a specific time in the life of a reader Once that time is gone, they loose their effect I have been meaning to procure this book since long, owing to my early interests in mystical weird stories that aim to incorporate everything under the sun Hell, I was even trying to write one of my own This was back in 2006 07, when fresh out of college, I used to spend considerable time in libraries, bookshops, among roadside vendors and spent hours on the internet se I am convinced that some books have a specific time in the life of a reader Once that time is gone, they loose their effect I have been meaning to procure this book since long, owing to my early interests in mystical weird stories that aim to incorporate everything under the sun Hell, I was even trying to write one of my own This was back in 2006 07, when fresh out of college, I used to spend considerable time in libraries, bookshops, among roadside vendors and spent hours on the internet searching for info on obscure books I responded enthusiastically to Borges every time I read the intro to The Book of Imaginary Beings, a book that was always by my bedside there is great pleasure in out of date erudition I particularly remember an old man lovingly called Thatha who had, or probably still has, a roadside bookshop near Luz corner in Chennai He was a simple man whose cloths were generally soiled by sitting in dirt for long, but he was a revered figure I couldn t communicate with him much, apart from asking him for a book or bargaining for a suitable price, because of my inability to speak in Tamil I had heard that he came to Chennai as a helper to a military officer in the year 1948 He had acted in few films He was a book tracker of sorts and had acquired a hero like figure among the reading community in Mylapore area He had helped me procure Mercea Eliade s Two Strange Tales, and a book on an encounter between Hermann Hesse and Carl Jung it was in poor condition and I couldn t save it from perishing along with an introductory book on Gurdjieff Those books were okay And as I remember Thatha from a far off vantage point it appears like a dream to me His shop, the streets of Mylapore, and some such places where I had the habit of loitering are the legends I have formed in my mind about my early reading life The books I read, and what I understood from them, was hardly as important as the fantasy of that time and place, a city which Madame Blavatsky thought well suited to establish the theosophical society It was as if I had, very briefly, escaped the gravity of the everyday life I remember having pestered Thatha to help me find Mount Analogue, but he couldn t.Now that the book has finally arrived it seems like a very pompous exercise It is the basis for Jodorowsky s The Holy Mountain a film that baffled and startled me But thankfully the book is comprehensible A group of eight people go in search for a mythical mountain the highest there is that remains invisible to the naked eye an inspiration for the island in the TV series LOST They take a boat journey, and their talks are singularly focused on self indulgent intellectualism, filled with pseudo theories They all look like caricatures or stock characters One character believes in something and personifies that belief, gets almost reduced to it Second has the sole job of countering the former s belief If a character is shown in great misery, it is because he is trying to solve complex optical problems That makes you smile because you find it cute Wasn t there pleasure to be had in such writing Turns out that there is a flourishing community at base of the mountain, with a currency of its own, altered religious practices, its own understanding of law and order, linguistic and social variations The peak remains elusive and difficult to access It symbolizes a spiritual experience Everyone can start at the base ground zero but very few can reach the peak It also helps to know that Rene Daumal s close friend was a student of Gurdjieff whose mystic teachings may have fueled the narrative The tension in the story comes from episodes like these And what if someone does not manage to pay his debts Arther Beaver had asked When you raise chicks, he was told, You advance them the grain which, when they become hens, they will repay you in eggs But when a young hen doesn t lay when it matures, what becomes of it And each of us had swallowed his saliva in silence.Isn t it lovely The ridiculous cliche of swallowing one s saliva to show fear or apprehension is almost dead now This 50 s novel is a relic that holds such nuggets And they work for a story like this Umberto Eco wrote that when he tried to remove all the unnecessary words or expressions from a Dumas novel to make it slicker for his translation it had lost its effect And to some extend, it seems true.It is a sad novel after all, ending abruptly because the writer died prematurely The final pages are about the group s repeated attempts to reach the peak, and how their struggle is thwarted by natural calamities and the authority, with their imposition of curious rules I was at my most attentive near the end Because here we are beginning to see the bravery of Daumal s design Did he plan the novel such that the group would never get to reach the peak That would certainly have symbolic interpretations But we can only guess An inventive book, it dares to create its own reality We will never know whether Daumal was another Francis Bacon writing his Novum Organum, convinced that he had hit the right notes and now had answers for us all, or someone who was ultimately planning to ridicule the whole ordeal That, dear friends, will forever remain a mystery and we all swallow our saliva in silence Mount Analogue may be the book that broke this reviewer s back What to say of it, but that it s brief tragically brief, given Daumal must have known he was racing the clock and immense And in fact, its brief immensity is almost fitting, because if not for a few nods by the narrator to a known future early on, undermined in any case by the switch to a diarist s present tense in Chapter 4 what better way for this impossible adventure to end than in mid sentence, on the slopes of the mounta Mount Analogue may be the book that broke this reviewer s back What to say of it, but that it s brief tragically brief, given Daumal must have known he was racing the clock and immense And in fact, its brief immensity is almost fitting, because if not for a few nods by the narrator to a known future early on, undermined in any case by the switch to a diarist s present tense in Chapter 4 what better way for this impossible adventure to end than in mid sentence, on the slopes of the mountain That said, I and, I m sure, most of Daumal s readers would have loved to see beyond the foothills, and when I first realised I d see no further I was near inconsolable on reaching the last line I turned to the first and began again Yet even a second reading has little clarified my impressions ironic, given Daumal s own narrative is nothing if not clear And it s this clarity fearless, given the esoteric nature of the topics it gazes upon that, paradoxically, imparts to Mount Analogue its near endless seeming mystical mysterious power.Point 1, then Mount Analogue describes a spiritual quest, but one which proceeds by scientific or quasi scientific deduction This science, or quasi science, abounding in paradox, provides thrills and high entertainment thanks to its practitioner s methodological principal, which consists of assuming the problem solved and deducing from this solution all the consequences that flow logically from it Thus is the absurdity of a mountain higher than Everest, which has never appeared on any map, explained by the curvature of space and light, which render it invisible to all except those entering from the west at sunset And when the crew of the Impossible make that entry, in a bravura use of white space, Daumal simply starts a new chapter A long wait for the unknown dampens the force of surprise.To me, this is one of many small miracles in this a small miracle of a book, which I first heard of 10 15 years ago, which I sought not urgently but steadily, almost subconsciously those several years, and to which, now that I ve found it six Australian dollars on a dusty Sydney shelf , I defer as to a literary spiritual cornerstone the likes of Hesse s Journey to the East, Kafka s The Castle or the best of Poe s tales, which in one sense the literary seem Daumal s clear forerunners, yet in another sense the spiritual seem hardly related at all Point 2 Daumal, on the strength of these 70 tantalising, frustrating, unresolved pages, is an idol.The different branches of the symbolic had been my favorite study for a long time I naively believed that I understood something about the subject further, as a mountaineer I had a passionate love of the mountains The consequence of these two very different kinds of interest in the same subject, mountains, had colored certain passages of my article with a definite lyricism Such conjunctions, incongruous as they may seem, play a large part in the genesis of what is called poetry I offer this remark as a suggestion to critics and aestheticians attempting to shed light on the depths of this mysterious language Point 3 Mount Analogue, mysterious as it is, by defining both its protagonist s quest and its author s, contains the means to its own solution Or might have done, if it were finished In any case, it makes sense, plainly and openly, while attempting to plumb the deepest mysteries of life and of art If I ve said little here, if what I ve said is confused, it s because my view of my own Mount Analogue obscures my view of others But that view mine, my own quest is, for now, all important As Daumal s narrator says when the members of his expedition consider postponing their ascent of the mountain in order to broaden their fields of knowledge in the town below , there s a time to nail that nasty owl of intellectual cupidity to the door Others Jimmy, Eddie, Nate have written here, eloquently, of Daumal s masterpiece My Overlook Press edition includes a 17 page introduction by a scholar Kathleen Ferrick Rosenblatt farknowledgeable than I am All I can add is it s for real, this Mount Analogue thing if a book is an engine for igniting sparks, it s incendiary Leave your owl at the door