@Ebook ô The Ordinary Spaceman: From Boyhood Dreams to Astronaut ⚜ eBook or E-pub free

Clay Anderson knew when he was nine years old that he wanted to grow up to be an astronaut He knew it when he witnessed the crew of Apollo 8 circling the Moon on Christmas Eve His passion for the black took him to NASA first as an intern, and then as employee, where he worked for well over a decade before the last of his fifteen applications to the astronaut program proper landed him a spot in the class of 1996 The Ordinary Astronaut is a memoir of his years at NASA and in the shuttle progra Clay Anderson knew when he was nine years old that he wanted to grow up to be an astronaut He knew it when he witnessed the crew of Apollo 8 circling the Moon on Christmas Eve His passion for the black took him to NASA first as an intern, and then as employee, where he worked for well over a decade before the last of his fifteen applications to the astronaut program proper landed him a spot in the class of 1996 The Ordinary Astronaut is a memoir of his years at NASA and in the shuttle program, one filled with interesting details but not much in the way of long term perspective Ordinary Spaceman is primarily a work of human interest, since Anderson almost never refers to his scientific work, or comments on the space program as a whole Unlike Tom JonesSky Walking, which combined Jones memoirs with a narrative history of NASA during the eighties and nineties to provide background information, there s no broad review of the organization We get instead workplace stories which happen to be set in space shuttles, the space station, and Russia s Star City Since this is NASA the work stories can be extraordinary for instance, early on he was asked by Rick Husband to be a family escort during Husband s mission aboard Columbia ordinarily, this involves driving the family around during launches and landings, getting them punch, and offering reassuring answers to concerned questions If the name Husband rings a bell, it should he commanded the Columbia when it broke apart in orbit, and Anderson became not just a valet, but the immediate focus of the family s sorrow and despair, helping them to shoulder their emotional burden a shared one, for he and Husband had trained together More cheerful is his account of the extensive time spent with Russian astronauts in Star City Anderson s class was required to have a rudimentary grasp on the Russian language, and part of his basic training took place in Russia where he learned their systems as well Stillfascinating is his recollection of time spent in NASA s underwater habitat, which offered its own difficulty and delight the photo of Anderson staring out into the water at a close range school of fish makes obvious the utter joy it brought to him The Ordinary Spaceman is an odd book It lives up to its title in that Anderson seems like a guy off the street, a Nebraska farmer in space He didn t enter NASA as a hotshot pilot, but as a civilian intern He met his wife in the cafeteria line and uses Wikipedia as his go to reference The first time he did this, to supplement his memory while reminiscing over Saturday morning cartoons, I thought it was funny The next five times, when he was referring to actual NASA history, not so much It abounds in stories about the mundane details of working for NASA, the inns and outs, without drifting into complaining I do mean ins and outs he goes into great detail on how to use a space toilet, records at length his body s reaction to returning to Earth by expelling fluid from every possible orifice, chronicles his attempt to self administer an enema, and proudly counts himself as the only man to poop in four space vessels two shuttles, Soyuz, and the ISS Towards the end the organization gets odd, very back and forth, frequently chatty but ultimately, Anderson is a nice guy who sustains the reader s sympathy and affection His career in NASA, by his own account, was undermined by his own weaknesses, like a short temper But he s not proud of failing at times, and does his best to make amends In that, he really is an ordinary guy, doing his best, and picking up the pieces when he goes off the rails The Ordinary Spaceman is better read as an account of a man s living the dream at NASA than about NASA or shuttle spaceflight in general, but a boyhood fantasy turned reality certainly has its appeal I haven t actually read the book yet, but I had the honor of meeting the author, Clayton Anderson, at Marcon 50 recently He s a fantastic story teller in the two ways that matter He has fantastic stories to tell, and he can tell them in a way that pulls in the audience the right amount of comedy, seriousness, and colorful descriptions as well as narrative If the book is even just half as good as the stories he tells in person, it s going to be hard to hang on to as I pass it from family m I haven t actually read the book yet, but I had the honor of meeting the author, Clayton Anderson, at Marcon 50 recently He s a fantastic story teller in the two ways that matter He has fantastic stories to tell, and he can tell them in a way that pulls in the audience the right amount of comedy, seriousness, and colorful descriptions as well as narrative If the book is even just half as good as the stories he tells in person, it s going to be hard to hang on to as I pass it from family member to family member saying read this now @Ebook ß The Ordinary Spaceman: From Boyhood Dreams to Astronaut õ What s it like to travel at thanMPH, riding in a supersonic Ttwin turbojet engine airplane What happens when the space station toilet breaks How do astronauts take out the trash on a spacewalk, tightly encapsulated in a space suit with just a few layers of fabric and Kevlar between them and the unforgiving vacuum of outer space The Ordinary Spaceman puts you in the flight suit of US astronaut Clayton C Anderson and takes you on the journey of this small town boy from Nebraska who spentdays living and working on the International Space Station, including than forty hours of space walks Having applied to NASA fifteen times over fifteen years to become an astronaut before his ultimate selection, Anderson offers a unique perspective on his life as a veteran space flier, one characterized by humility and perseveranceFrom the application process to launch aboard the space shuttle Atlantis, from serving as a family escort for the ill fated Columbia crew into his own daily struggles family separation, competitive battles to win coveted flight assignments, the stress of a highly visible job, and the ever present risk of having to make the ultimate sacrifice Anderson shares the full range of his experiences With a mix of levity and gravitas, Anderson gives an authentic view of the highs and the lows, the triumphs and the tragedies of life as a NASA astronautPurchase the audio edition The Ordinary Spaceman From Boyhood Dreams to Astronaut by Clayton C Anderson I have read many Astronaut Memoirs, and this ranks as one of my favorites I have also met many astronauts, and Clay is among the coolest He has a gentle sense of humor, and an honesty and integrity that match his mostly outstanding career But really, to me, just an Earthbound misfit , it is love of God, family and yes country, that place him head and shoulders above so many of us.This memoir is not a techn The Ordinary Spaceman From Boyhood Dreams to Astronaut by Clayton C Anderson I have read many Astronaut Memoirs, and this ranks as one of my favorites I have also met many astronauts, and Clay is among the coolest He has a gentle sense of humor, and an honesty and integrity that match his mostly outstanding career But really, to me, just an Earthbound misfit , it is love of God, family and yes country, that place him head and shoulders above so many of us.This memoir is not a technical compendium of his career Nor is it an exercise in self aggrandizement From the first pages of the book, you get a sense that you are having a great conversation with an old friend It s as if you and he are couch surfing, sharing a glass of wine, and just reminiscing about your life s adventures together When I say together, Clay brings you along in his journey, and pulls no punches Nor does he offer excuses, or shift blame when it s his turn to be a human He is candid and forthright in the only way he can be If you read this whole book without shedding some tears, then you need to find the place where you put your heart Because, make no mistake, you will shed tears, both for his joys, and also for his pains Yes, he is that honest As we all know, there is no such thing as an Ordinary Spaceman but then again, we all knew the Earth was flat once, didn t we Very descriptive and informative with a touch of humor at every turn I felt like I was in the book living the experiences right along with Clay The life of an astronaut is one of awe and wonder and being able to read a memoir that gives the reader a glimpse of the life is quite an enjoyable ride. This is a wonderful book I really enjoyed reading it Clay s story is truly inspiring I appreciated his honest, vulnerable, and humorous approach in telling his story I laughed, I cried, and I learnedabout NASA and space travel than I ever knew before I have the honor and privilege of knowing Clay and his family, and they are beautiful people inside and out I wish them all the very best in their next adventure What a book Clay Anderson has done a terrific job of bleeding his story into a book that all can enjoy Thanks Clay, for showing the behind the scenes of JSC, and your own story. As close as it getsAnderson s tale help us earthlings to feel what is like to live in space and the amazing effort it takes to get there Thanks for sharing He is not a run of the mill astronaut Awesome that he names names in this book He really wears his heart on his sleeve. Question If you kept a dream career alive from the age of nine and applied for that dream position fourteen times and subsequently was rejected fourteen times, would you apply the fifteenth time Well, Clayton Anderson was one who did On that fifteenth attempt, Anderson was finally accepted into NASA s astronaut corps The author s thirty year career with the space agency, half that time as an engineer and the last half as an astronaut could be reason enough to write a book about his experienc Question If you kept a dream career alive from the age of nine and applied for that dream position fourteen times and subsequently was rejected fourteen times, would you apply the fifteenth time Well, Clayton Anderson was one who did On that fifteenth attempt, Anderson was finally accepted into NASA s astronaut corps The author s thirty year career with the space agency, half that time as an engineer and the last half as an astronaut could be reason enough to write a book about his experiences But, Anderson s never give up determination to fulfill his childhood ambition to fly in space sets his memoir apart from most journals written by his fellow spacemen and spacewomen.With the help of novelist Nevada Barr, Anderson set out to keep this 348 page career retrospective interesting and irreverent He succeeded on both counts Consider this Anderson s initial flight in NASA s T 38 trainer, his first Zoom and Boom ended with an emergency trip to a trash can to Whirl and Hurl For any reader with a delicate stomach, Anderson s orientation flight two months into his astronaut training should be extremely entertaining even to the earth bound reader.Anderson takes the reader on a behind the scenes tour of the making of a NASA space flyer Beginning with that check ride in a jet trainer, you ll later get wet during NEEMO 5, a two week underwater adventure in a space station like habitat off Key Largo Then you ll make numerous trips to Russia to train with the cosmonauts Anderson gives you a crash course in survival in the forests of Maine and Wyoming If you remember where you were and what you were doing on January 16, 2003, Chapter 7 will be a highlight for you Anderson was intimately involved with the family of the Columbia shuttle crew both before and after their ill fated launch.Chapter 11 remains a mystery Anderson describes in mind numbing detail the process involved in designing and producing uniform patches for the astronaut crews I m still not sure why he felt the need to include that Perhaps it was to explain the color photos of some of those patches, especially the ones he either helped design and or was a member of the crew.Chapters 13 and 14 catalog some of Anderson s darkest days as a NASA employee Not many space heroes would put into writing stories of their dust ups with authorities Anderson does He s not afraid to admit his slip to the dark side Warts and all.Chapter 15, titled The Void of Outer Space, has to be a classic example of Anderson at his irreverent best Pretty much the entire chapter is devoted to how astronauts relieve themselves in the vacuum of space In fact, Anderson seems obsessed with potty humor The author s detailed description of having a bowel movement under the sea as a NEEMO aquanaut would make Bob Saget proud Anderson leaves no polyp unturned in his guided tour through an enema and subsequent procto sigmoidoscopy If you have ever experienced or witnessed either medical procedure, you might find yourself laughing out loud By his own admission, Anderson may hold some sort of record for taking a crap in the most space craft in orbit Anderson boasts, I pooped in four different spaceships I found Anderson s obsession with beautiful women a bit strange in light of his self proclaimed devotion to his wife and family A case in point, his trip as an astronaut trainee to a porn bar in New Orleans Or, how about his experience with a gorgeous young Russian woman tasked with measuring him for a space suit Or, how about Anna, the Russian space worker un dressed in pale peach colored high heels and a matching see through dress To be fair, Anderson s attention to a woman s figure and fashion gets equal time when he first met Susan Harreld, the extraordinarily beautifultallblonde, dressed in a dark green dress who would turn out to be his wife and mother of their children.By the time Anderson left NASA, he had accumulated thirty eight hours and twenty eight minutes over six space walks Here s where this out of this world travel log breaks down For me, Anderson makes no effort to keep all those EVA s separate I found the entire tour extremely confusing It doesn t help that the author jumps back and forth in both time and space But then again, if Anderson had kept things in chronological order, the result may not have been as interesting or irreverent As it is, this tale of boyhood dreams to astronaut is anything but ordinary