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READ PDF ⚫ The Outline of Sanity ë As an advocate of Distributism, an early th century school of social thought developed by the author and his colleagues, Chesterton addresses the topics of concentration of wealth, poverty, work, agriculture, machinery, and capital in this famous work He favored distribution of wealth while being antisocialist he advocated ownership of private property while being anticapitalist He argues that the economic order is bound by moral law and that man should be served by the economy rather than serving it I really want to like Chesterton I certainly do like many of his ideas on a gut level For instance, the idea of a widespread peasantry is great And he s absolutely right that there is an undeniable spiritual element to the well being of society.For all that, the man just can t let pass the opportunity to use an analogy He piles one on top of another They can be excellent, they can be amusing, they can be elucidating But the sheer volume of them overwhelms. This book certainly makes you stop and ponder evenso when you realise that not much, if anything has changed since it was written over 90 years ago Corporate monoliths are alive and well advertisers still tell people in a bullying way that they must Do It Now when they need not do it at all taken from my favourite chapter The Bluff of the Big Shops Written in the usual Chestertonian style it does not have the wit of some of his other works and rightly so this is a serious This book certainly makes you stop and ponder evenso when you realise that not much, if anything has changed since it was written over 90 years ago Corporate monoliths are alive and well advertisers still tell people in a bullying way that they must Do It Now when they need not do it at all taken from my favourite chapter The Bluff of the Big Shops Written in the usual Chestertonian style it does not have the wit of some of his other works and rightly so this is a serious work about serious matters close to his heart, which point out in many ways that we don t have to accept the status quo and that we easily do In the aforementioned chapter he writes I am merely pointing out that if we came to the conclusion that big shops ought to be boycotted, we could boycott them as easily as we should I hope shops selling instruments of torture or poisons for private use in the home Chesterton ventures that it is not a question of necessity but of will I think we have forgotten this A great primer on Distributism, to be prefaced by Rerum Novarum. Although Chesterton wrote this book in the early twentieth century, it remains just as relevant today in a world where we continue to see massive consolidation, corporations too big to fail, relentless standardization of the products that shape our lives, and the increasing machine mentality to make the so called medicine go down This book is a summation of an ongoing series of debates that Chesterton engaged in with a range of Capitalists and Socialists on the question of a proposed third alte Although Chesterton wrote this book in the early twentieth century, it remains just as relevant today in a world where we continue to see massive consolidation, corporations too big to fail, relentless standardization of the products that shape our lives, and the increasing machine mentality to make the so called medicine go down This book is a summation of an ongoing series of debates that Chesterton engaged in with a range of Capitalists and Socialists on the question of a proposed third alternative that he and others advocated for, called Distributivism In short, Distributivism is deeply opposed to the tendency to consolidate power that is characteristic of both Capitalism and State Socialism, and instead argues for the radical distribution of the means for individuals to possess and maintain private property and creative enterprises in pursuit of life in a particular place On this approach, Chesterton imagines a flourishing society of small shopkeepers and people that are committed to the land that is able to sustain them In many ways Chesterton s Distributivism shares a number of similarities to an ethic of agrarianism that has been propounded at various times in the United States In both, there is a fascinating criticism of the way in which we relate to modern technology and this should be studied further as we look for ameaningful life than cycles of boom and bust consumption in the 21st century This book is not quite as tight as Orthodoxy was, but nonetheless, every few paragraphs there are deep and penetrating insights that are worth pondering and that make this a worthwhile read from beginning to end