*Read Epub Ø Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software -2nd Ed. ê eBook or Kindle ePUB free

*Read Epub Ä Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software -2nd Ed. â Design Patterns is a modern classic in the literature of object oriented development, offering timeless and elegant solutions to common problems in software design It describes patterns for managing object creation, composing objects into larger structures, and coordinating control flow between objects The book provides numerous examples where using composition rather than inheritance can improve the reusability and flexibility of code Note, though, that it s not a tutorial but a catalog that you can use to find an object oriented design pattern that s appropriate for the needs of your particular application a selection for virtuoso programmers who appreciate or require consistent, well engineered object oriented designs Beautiful Book for very complicated topic for developers and software architects I liked the first chapter of introduction very much and one of the best trends I have learned from this book is that, You don t have to use all design patterns in the software you are making, just use what you think it is useful for the current situation and purpose of the current software you are working on now. Read to understand patterns, but please think for yourself when you code. I know this is an unpopular opinion, but I think the concept of a design pattern is just this side of bogus Part of the issue is that the languages the industry has chosen have weak powers of abstraction and thus these patterns seem necessary Perhaps it s becoming a cliche or became one 10 years ago , but I m sure some haven t yet been exposed to this thought in a decent language like Lisp, most of these design patterns are trivial The patterns are only there to make up for the problems wi I know this is an unpopular opinion, but I think the concept of a design pattern is just this side of bogus Part of the issue is that the languages the industry has chosen have weak powers of abstraction and thus these patterns seem necessary Perhaps it s becoming a cliche or became one 10 years ago , but I m sure some haven t yet been exposed to this thought in a decent language like Lisp, most of these design patterns are trivial The patterns are only there to make up for the problems with the languages of choice.For me another issue is that the idea of design patterns is firmly linked in my brain with absurd Java APIs that require me to deal with XYZManagers and ABCHandlers and twenty different classes all for something that anyone sane would have just provided a handful of simple functions for On the other hand, this post by Richard Gabriel is interesting design patterns are worth looking into after all, just not in this book A must have primer for any developer working with object oriented code While it was a decent read from front to back though a bit long , it is evenuseful as a reference Some of the terms are outdated by today s coding conventions, but the principles still apply and it is a fair exercise in mentally converting between the lingo used in the book and what you may be familiar with in C , Java, or another OOP One interesting aspect is that you can immediately start to see what programming p A must have primer for any developer working with object oriented code While it was a decent read from front to back though a bit long , it is evenuseful as a reference Some of the terms are outdated by today s coding conventions, but the principles still apply and it is a fair exercise in mentally converting between the lingo used in the book and what you may be familiar with in C , Java, or another OOP One interesting aspect is that you can immediately start to see what programming patterns you re already using today in the frameworks and libraries you may be using on a daily basis Putting a name to these design patterns, such as Factory, Command, etc helps to identify them and understand them so you as a developer know when best to apply them to your own code Certainly worth having on any OOP software developer s bookshelf