{KINDLE} ¹ Stalin's Curse: Battling for Communism in War and Cold War ì eBook or E-pub free

A serious analysis of the way Stalin shaped the communism first in USSR and then in Europe and Asia.Even in the Eastern European countries his army occupied after the war, where he succeeded to impose communist regimes, he couldn t have the total control he had in USSR Unoccupied communist countries such as Yugoslavia and Albania wriggled out of his control.The Marshal Plan ensured the economic recovery of the Western Europe so the western communist parties he sustained weren t attractive enoug A serious analysis of the way Stalin shaped the communism first in USSR and then in Europe and Asia.Even in the Eastern European countries his army occupied after the war, where he succeeded to impose communist regimes, he couldn t have the total control he had in USSR Unoccupied communist countries such as Yugoslavia and Albania wriggled out of his control.The Marshal Plan ensured the economic recovery of the Western Europe so the western communist parties he sustained weren t attractive enough for their electorates and despite some initial electoral successes they faded into protest parties, continuously subsidised by Kremlin.I knew the main events but the twist and turns of the various communist parties and their leaders described in the book enhanced my view of the period.Some less known points Poles and Czechs saw the red army occupation as an opportunity to deport their entire Germans population The ethnic cleansing was accompanied by violence and expropriation In both countries, unlike Romania or Hungary, it was a pro soviet sentiment in part of the population Tito was an expansionist, who wanted to create a Greater Yugoslavia by annexing Albania, Bulgaria and parts of Romania and Hungary After his breaking up with Stalin, he ruled in Stalinist style, murdering many opponents and putting possible opponents in jail Anti Semitism flourished in all communist countries In Poland, after the war, some returning Jews were killed in a pogrom Mr Gellately has crafted a readable account of Soviet foreign policy at the dawn of the Cold War Some myths are explored and debunked, others are merely asserted as false with little explanation in the text The author asserts that Stalin was drivenby ideology than realpolitik or his own personal paranoia but hardly proves that assertion.In fairness, Stalin s Curse does come with a fair amount of end notes and sourcing Still, as a lay person I can t take it upon myself to validate hi Mr Gellately has crafted a readable account of Soviet foreign policy at the dawn of the Cold War Some myths are explored and debunked, others are merely asserted as false with little explanation in the text The author asserts that Stalin was drivenby ideology than realpolitik or his own personal paranoia but hardly proves that assertion.In fairness, Stalin s Curse does come with a fair amount of end notes and sourcing Still, as a lay person I can t take it upon myself to validate his research The author could take the time to weave these findings into the narrative a bitas opposed to simply stating his conclusions Show, don t tell, if archival documents prove his thesis then he may speak of those findings as part of the narrative Further, he tends to lend a fair amount of weight to comments by historical figures when it fits his thesis but choses ignore those that do not Case in point Tito was known to have questioned Stalin s commitment to Internationalism but this aspect seems to get scant coverage in the work The Yugoslavian Soviet rift gets ample time but the focus remains on Tito s intransigence, his reluctance to take instruction from Moscow Why Tito s questioning of Stalin s commitment to the cause is overshadowed by the comments of fawning sycophants is a mystery.Other historians Montefiore for example have documented with great detail Stalin s pathologies and the steps he was willing to take to consolidate power Millions were destroyed as the dictator hardened a protective cocoon of paranoia around himself, the Kremlin, the Soviet Union, and finally Soviet satellites In a sense Mr Gellately is beingcharitable by stating that Stalin s primary motivation was ideology as opposed to somethingbase Further, he himself would surely concede that these two concepts are not mutually exclusive Stalin was a man motivated by ideology AND a need to enhance the security of the Soviet State in turn his own power and well being as he believed he was the state.Any reader interested in the history of the Cold War or of the USSR will certainly enjoy this book The narrative has a good pace and you could certainly finish Stalin s Curse in a weekend It is possible that Gellately sacrificed his ability to present his evidence on the altar of readability The narrative simply does not lend itself to in depth analysis Still, another possibility is that his premise is flawed and that Stalin though motivated by Communist zeal used his so called love for the proletariat as camouflage to hide his own sociopathic pursuit of power This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Bla bla bla Stalin is the one of the worst tyrants bla bla bla killed trillions with one hand.The book for brainwashed apologists of the theory that the market itself will adjust everything and who considers economics as a study book of economic science, not the bible of totalitarian sect s of so called liberls who has in common with liberty as much as Hitler had This is a valuable complement to Manchester s The Last Lion, much of which is about the budding relationship between Roosevelt and Churchill on one side, and Stalin on the other, to Max Hasting s Inferno, about Stalin Red Army in Hitler s the Eastern Front, and Snyder s Bloodlands, about the 1939 Nonagression Pact s division of the Ukraine and Poland between Hitler and Stalin, and the subsequent mass deaths by famine and violence Each book shows the disdain for life by Uncle Joe, a disda This is a valuable complement to Manchester s The Last Lion, much of which is about the budding relationship between Roosevelt and Churchill on one side, and Stalin on the other, to Max Hasting s Inferno, about Stalin Red Army in Hitler s the Eastern Front, and Snyder s Bloodlands, about the 1939 Nonagression Pact s division of the Ukraine and Poland between Hitler and Stalin, and the subsequent mass deaths by famine and violence Each book shows the disdain for life by Uncle Joe, a disdain that went beyond even Hitler s.Gellately argues that Stalin was not crazy in the normal sense he did not like to kill people as a serial killer might Rather, he simply was indifferent to the human costs of his policies, whether they were military, economic collectivization , or political lost lives were the fodder in which Communism would grow Gellately throws out an estimate that about 50 million lives might have been lost during Stalin s reign half during WWII about half of that from combat, the other half from collateral damage and the remaining 25 million from his efforts to pursue his economic policies e.g., his 1930s policy of stripping food from the farmers, whom he characterized as rich peasants, or kulaks, and diverting it to feed the urban industrial workforce The first third of the book is about Stalin s manipulation of Roosevelt and Churchill in the division of postwar spoils how would Eastern Europe, particularly Poland, be divided would Germany be deindustrialized or reindustrialized Roosevelt for the first, Churchill for the second , how would Germany be divvied up This was the subject of the Yalta Conference, which Stalin ignored when the time came The second third is about the postwar development of Eastern Europe, with East Germany, Hungary, Checkoslavakia, Estonia, Bulgaria and Albania coming under the USSR s umbrella Stalin publicly argued that every nation should have a democratic system and should choose its own path Privately he controlled each nation down to the finest detail His strategy was simple set up national fronts in a country each would be a collection of communist puppet groups that would give the appearance of competitive political parties , have democratic elections that would allocate power among those parties, then when communism was an accepted fact, lift the curtain and have a single communist party controlled by Stalin By 1950 he had succeeded and every Eastern European country was competing to beStalinist than the others.The last third of the book is notes and biography.Several interesting insights emerge in this history The first is that though Stalin presented his reach for Eastern European control as a national security issue the USSR needed buffer states he was really driven by Leninist ideology, that is, by the goal of solidifying Communism in Russia, then extending extending it across Europe and into Asia Another interesting observation is that the Cold War was Stalin s creation, starting with the Berlin Blockade of 1948 which was initiated by a trumped up dispute over issuing new German currency A third is that FDR thinking that he could charm Stalin and thus work with him, was hoodwinked by Stalin, who charmed FDR into thinking that he would negotiate on any important issues Truman with the assistance of George Kennan s Long Telegram saw muchclearly that Stalin s tactic was to pretend to negotiate until he was given what he wanted One wonders what we would have given away if Roosevelt had lived According to Robert Gellately, the author of this fine book, millions of ordinary people have been inspired by Joseph Stalin and millions have shouldered his actions and legacy as a curse Approximately 25 million people perished in the USSR as a result of some kind of repression, the largest share undoubtedly during Stalin s reign Gellately argues that Stalin was a devoted adherent of the communist ideology and cause He didn t view himself as an imperialist tsar but rather a savior for his p According to Robert Gellately, the author of this fine book, millions of ordinary people have been inspired by Joseph Stalin and millions have shouldered his actions and legacy as a curse Approximately 25 million people perished in the USSR as a result of some kind of repression, the largest share undoubtedly during Stalin s reign Gellately argues that Stalin was a devoted adherent of the communist ideology and cause He didn t view himself as an imperialist tsar but rather a savior for his people and everyone else The cult of Stalin and his style of leadership was emulated by communist leaders all over the world Gellately quotes a Bulgarian playwright as saying that the communist regime in Bulgaria drilled the idea that Stalin was the greatest man on earth An elderly Bulgarian farmer once told me that he wasn t a communist, but rather a Stalinist His justification was simple if you are as formidable as Stalin, other powerful actors would think twice before messing with you He went on to say that the US would never have invaded Iraq if Saddam Hussein was as fearsome as Stalin Fearsome as Stalin was, Gellately drives home the point that it was his shrewd political skills that enabled him to get want he wanted in various negotiations with Western leaders FDR and Truman had misplaced and naive views that conflicts with the Soviets could be resolved via personal diplomacy Byrja i essari b k kj lfar innr sar R ssa Kr mskaga v m r datt hug a henni v ri a finna uppl singar um hvernig Stal n hef i fari me kra nub a og jafnvel Kr mverja Ekki var n miki sagt af v en voru fr legar m lsgreinar h r og ar um etta og l kt og ma ur vissi svo sem var etta lj t saga Ekki var s ur fr legt a rifja upp st una Austur Evr pu lok heims styrjaldarinnar en komust komm nistar til valda essum l ndum, flestar j irnar v ru alfari m t Byrja i essari b k kj lfar innr sar R ssa Kr mskaga v m r datt hug a henni v ri a finna uppl singar um hvernig Stal n hef i fari me kra nub a og jafnvel Kr mverja Ekki var n miki sagt af v en voru fr legar m lsgreinar h r og ar um etta og l kt og ma ur vissi svo sem var etta lj t saga Ekki var s ur fr legt a rifja upp st una Austur Evr pu lok heims styrjaldarinnar en komust komm nistar til valda essum l ndum, flestar j irnar v ru alfari m ti eim, vegna ess a eir h f u Rau a herinn bak vi sig Ekki svipa stand er n na Krimskaga ar sem b i er a bo a til atkv agrei slu um sj lfst i h ra sis n egar a er fullt af r ssneskum herm nnum ar En n g um tengsl b karinnar vi atbur i dagsins dag D mur minn um hana er s a h r er um almennt yfirlit yfir t mabili fr 1929 1953 a r a og hvergi er fari mj g dj pt hlutina og v arf ekki a koma vart a l ti kom fram sem ma ur vissi ekki fyrir a var helst um mi bik b karinnar umfj lluninni um fyrstu m nu i Truman emb tti sem ma ur las eitthva bitast tt Anna sem angra i mig nokku var a h fundurinn l sir Stal n sem brj lu um snillingi sem alltaf vissi hva hann var a gera me an a Vesturveldin reifu u sig bara fram A mati h fundarins liggur s kin Kalda str inu einnig alfari hj hinum fyrrnefnda me an Bandar kin og bandalags j ir eirra eru bl saklaus g er reyndar samm la h fundi um a a Kalda str i s R ssum a kenna en l sing hans atbur ar sinni finnst m r hins vegar of einfeldningsleg B kin er vel skrifu en g vil minnast nokkur atri i fyrsta lagi tv tekur h fundur sig nokku annan sta fara a birtast pers nulegar l singar samt amanna lok b karinnar sem h f u ekki s st fyrr Ekkert a sl ku en hef i tt a hafa samr mi gegnum alla b kina A lokum nefnir h fundur upphafi b karinnar a Stal n hafi n nast einn og studdur m ta samf l g Austur Evr pu eftir str en svo egar kemur a eim k flum b kinni vir ist hann hafa skipt um sko un og talar nokku um hrif heimamanna Gellately uses an enormous amount of information in several languages, he highlights Stalin s geopolitical designs and demonstrates, against revisionist histoical claims, that it was the USSR, not the US and her allies, that wanted and provoked the Cold War This is particularly important now when historical ignorance and poor scholarship meet in attempts to present a dangerously naive US politician such as Henry Wallace, Franklin D Roosevelt s vice president from 1941 to 1945, as a visionary Gellately uses an enormous amount of information in several languages, he highlights Stalin s geopolitical designs and demonstrates, against revisionist histoical claims, that it was the USSR, not the US and her allies, that wanted and provoked the Cold War This is particularly important now when historical ignorance and poor scholarship meet in attempts to present a dangerously naive US politician such as Henry Wallace, Franklin D Roosevelt s vice president from 1941 to 1945, as a visionary statesman.As a historian of Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia, Gellately offers a view of Stalin s political, diplomatic and psychological manoeuvres that allowed the USSR to achieve superpower status The author has incredable knowledge of his subject and provides a compelling narrative of deception, brutality, foolishness and betrayed idealism Gellately rightly emphasises Stalin s fixation on internal enemies as well as his dedication to the purity of official doctrine For anyone who favors Bernie Sanders or any other Socialist, read this book Socialism, Communismsame thingit does not work and this book will show you why This book covers Stalin s rule in the USSR The part set in WWII didn t have much that was new to me but in the second half, I learned a lot about Stalinism in the Cold War One of the best sentences in the book came near the end, when the author tells us that trading freedom and political rights for the state s provision of material For anyone who favors Bernie Sanders or any other Socialist, read this book Socialism, Communismsame thingit does not work and this book will show you why This book covers Stalin s rule in the USSR The part set in WWII didn t have much that was new to me but in the second half, I learned a lot about Stalinism in the Cold War One of the best sentences in the book came near the end, when the author tells us that trading freedom and political rights for the state s provision of material benefits failed Stalin knew a lot He was smart, sneaky, manipulative, and a good enough actor to hide his faults FDR, Churchill, and Truman all fell for the actor and didn t see the evil But he didn t know people, and popular support is essential for a system to survive According to statistical analysts, the human cost of Stalinism was about 31 million people including entire nations and not including those who died in WWII That s a lot of death for a system that failed {KINDLE} ê Stalin's Curse: Battling for Communism in War and Cold War × A chilling, riveting account based on newly released Russian documentation that reveals Joseph Stalin s true motives and the extent of his enduring commitment to expanding the Soviet empire during the years in which he seemingly collaborated with Franklin D Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and the capitalist West At the Big Three conferences of World War II, Stalin persuasively played the role of a great world leader Even astute observers like George F Kennan concluded that the United States and Great Britain should view Stalin as a modern day tsarist like figure whose primary concerns lay in international strategy and power politics, not in ideology Now Robert Gellately uses recently uncovered documents to make clear that, in fact, the dictator was an unwavering revolutionary merely biding his time, determined as ever to establish Communist regimes across Europe and beyond, and that his actions during these years and the poorly calculated Western responses set in motion what would eventually become the Cold War Gellately takes us behind the scenes We see the dictator disguising his political ambitions and prioritizing the future of Communism, even as he pursued the war against Hitler Along the way, the ascetic dictator s Machiavellian moves and bouts of irrationality kept the Western leaders on their toes, in a world that became dangerous and divided year by year Exciting, deeply engaging, and shrewdly perceptive, Stalin s Curse is an unprecedented revelation of the sinister machinations of the Soviet dictator It has become very fashionable to repeatedly insult the Soviet Union when you talk about it I suppose scholarly neutrality shouldn t get in the way of self righteousness Books on Hitler take for granted that he did evil things and don t need to constantly point it out It s self evident When there is a moral judgment, it s often in the prologue or epilogue The same should be done for the USSR or Stalin I definitely like opinions and an analysis of people s motives as a book goes along, but It has become very fashionable to repeatedly insult the Soviet Union when you talk about it I suppose scholarly neutrality shouldn t get in the way of self righteousness Books on Hitler take for granted that he did evil things and don t need to constantly point it out It s self evident When there is a moral judgment, it s often in the prologue or epilogue The same should be done for the USSR or Stalin I definitely like opinions and an analysis of people s motives as a book goes along, but I don t need it peppered with reminders of how terrible the people are and, especially, a tone that looks down on the subject The author s style is probably due to a legacy of the USA s policy of calling the Soviet Union the Evil Empire