`Ebook ✓ Pub Walks In Underhill Country ⇰ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

I found this hard going it s written in the main character s voice and since his a pompous pedant it s quite hard going It gets better as you go along andof his own personal life creeps into the walking guides but stillI know it s had some good reviews, I just didn t really like the character very much and it felt like it was much too long to string out the idea. It s funny that almost all the reviews on here by women hated Pub Walks On the whole I really enjoyed it and found myself liking enormously rambling ubernerd Graham Underhill and his literary pretensions Quite aside from his obsession with walking and his meticulous detailing of the hills he loves and the invariably well kept ales he refreshes himself with, he has a remarkably wide breadth of knowledge and a commendably broadminded attitude towards everything from heavy metal and recreatio It s funny that almost all the reviews on here by women hated Pub Walks On the whole I really enjoyed it and found myself liking enormously rambling ubernerd Graham Underhill and his literary pretensions Quite aside from his obsession with walking and his meticulous detailing of the hills he loves and the invariably well kept ales he refreshes himself with, he has a remarkably wide breadth of knowledge and a commendably broadminded attitude towards everything from heavy metal and recreational drugs to gay relationships Then there s the unswerving devotion to his selfish, attention seeking and less than faithful wife Sunita, whom he may or may not have bumped off in a crime passionel by the final chapters There s something rather heroic about Graham, bore and pedant though he is Pub Walks is highly original, expertly crafted and at times very funny Some of Graham s observations and turns of phrase are hilarious Personally, I could have done withof the fake walking guide, which contain most of the cleverest and funniest passages, and rather less of the Sunita saga, which I found ratherobvious and a bit laboured The initial concept of a walking guide in which the narrator s private life intrudes was fascinating but became less believable theGraham cracked on about his wife and his ghastly friends Nevertheless, in Graham Underhill Nat Segnit has created a memorable and very British character Pub Walks willthan repay your attention with its full bodied characterisation and striking notes of humour And yes, I know I m writing like Graham Underhill The worrying thing is, I think I do anyway This very funny book features an unreliable narrator of one of the lesser known types the incorrigible naif It purports to be the most recent of numerous self published walking guides written by Graham Underhill, rambler, nature lover, beer enthusiast, and relentlessly cuckolded husband of the ravishing Sunita.The book is organized into a series of numbered treks though the Malvern region of England, during the course of which small cracks slowly begin to appear in Underhill s obliviousness H This very funny book features an unreliable narrator of one of the lesser known types the incorrigible naif It purports to be the most recent of numerous self published walking guides written by Graham Underhill, rambler, nature lover, beer enthusiast, and relentlessly cuckolded husband of the ravishing Sunita.The book is organized into a series of numbered treks though the Malvern region of England, during the course of which small cracks slowly begin to appear in Underhill s obliviousness His ecstasies over the beauty of the countryside are frequently punctuated by throwaway remarks that almost accidentally illuminate the environmental degradation to be seen everywhere The twin themes of the despoiled English landscape and Underhill s crumbling marriage might be very affecting if you allowed yourself to think about them, which I didn t and they could make Underhill out to be a very poignant character indeed if he weren t so invincible in his pompous good cheer.PUB WALKS reminds me a good deal of John Lanchester s THE DEBT TO PLEASURE, only in reverse the malign Tarquin Winot is a master manipulator, whereas Underhill is a hapless manipulatee The narrative s a little uneven, and toward the end the structure begins to fall apart, but who cares This book is loads of fun to read had to order this well reserved at the library after reading a review at the weekend because it s a novel about walking between pubs which Clare and I do a lot of, plus it s set around Birmingham, the city itself and also the Malvern Hills etc well I did order it because I couldn t wait and started reading immediately it s hilarious..I m really an urbanite, a city bloke now, but I was born and brought up in a country town Tewkesbury , ten miles or so down the road from where the main c had to order this well reserved at the library after reading a review at the weekend because it s a novel about walking between pubs which Clare and I do a lot of, plus it s set around Birmingham, the city itself and also the Malvern Hills etc well I did order it because I couldn t wait and started reading immediately it s hilarious..I m really an urbanite, a city bloke now, but I was born and brought up in a country town Tewkesbury , ten miles or so down the road from where the main character, Graham Underhill lives Ledbury I didn t miss the countryside until I hit 50, but now try to get out at weekends for walks, and it is like re living my childhood and youth when we wanted to get stoned trip we headed out to the hills I do love my walks, even though I m not cut out for it I m scared of horses, bulls, cows and, especially, dogs I have the same prejudices against ramblers that many have, I quite understood the lad in God s Own Country who despises them Daft sods in pink and green hats and try not to resemble them I do not for instance wear a tri climate luminescent jacket like Graham, or have a compass around my neck, or a map in polythene, or a walking stick although that would come in handy now and again Of course my muddy boots give me away when I get to the pub, and my rucksack here called pedantically a ramblesack Nor am I a real ale freak, I mof a lager man of the Becks Peroni type bland palate obviously Graham of course loves real ale and describes many brews in the book I drank three and a half pints of Wickwar s ish Cotswold Way 4.2% , whose upfront maltiness, followed by figgy, pruney notes reminiscent of Moroccan tagines, only added to its intense drinkability Anyway I m trying to tell you how deeply I understand this character and how he s not like me, well he is a bit, I m a librarian and must have some of the geek in me This bloke is geek x 100, pompous, boring, a man with a personality bypass, and wilfully blind to all that goes on around him or is he Sometimes you wonder The book is set out as a series of walks 15 in all , with maps and watercolour illustrations and rating for the pub and difficulty I ve walked most of them, although I tend towards the 5 6 mile walk, Graham would find that pitiful Stratford, Snitterfield, the Long Mynd, Birmingham, Bourton on the Water and the Slaughters in the Cotswolds , been to many of the pubs, so I suppose it holds special interest for me eg I was fascinated to learn about the origins of Pitville Park in Cheltenham where I spent many Sundays as a child It has the jaunty pompous style of a guide book Turn right and walk up the busy main road for half a mile, passing a newsagent, where you might like to stock up on water or something from proprietor Iqbal s mouth watering range of self packaged sweets There s nothing like a well timed Fruit Pastille to propel you up that mid ramble incline But then personal notes creep in Pass this ruin with potential on the right, and ascending a steep path to climb a stile into High Wood, call out your companion s name at the top of your voice It becomes a tale of a man desperate to hang on to his beautiful but probably promiscuous Bengali wife, Sunita, and the walks are relegated in one case becoming just a footnote to their story as she finds excuses not to come on walks or disappears when on them Graham is painfully obtuse, making excuses for her behaviour, but the reader is also alerted to a possible latent violent streak in him It becomes quite Nabokovian in style all those deceptions the elusive object of beauty and his love rivals the footnotes the butterflies Graham s amazing erudition he knows his history, architecture, literature, biology, natural history all of which seem fine, but I did wonder about his knowledge of popular culture, eg that Tony Iommi of Black Sabbath invented the power chord because he lost the tips of his fingers in an industrial accident, and that a footnote interesting to note the centrality of rambling to early Led Zeppelin In many ways it s a kind of a cross between Lolita and Pale Fire view spoiler his first wife dies accidently following a butterfly over a cliff, in the nude, apart from a pair of boots hide spoiler I m not sure in the end if it all added up, but I enjoyed the ramble through this book, its dead ends alternative routes and natural beauties I laughed and read bits out to Clare all the time Mark of a good book I think I took a while to warm to this, I m not sure why but I initially put it down after the first chapter and didn t come back to it for a couple of months But I m glad I did This is a strange mix of travel guide and darkly comic novel, at times reminiscent of an older 1930s or 40s comic novel We follow the main character through his walking guide, almost a book within the book, but one that very often diverges into the personal relationships and trials of his life, most notably with his often abse I took a while to warm to this, I m not sure why but I initially put it down after the first chapter and didn t come back to it for a couple of months But I m glad I did This is a strange mix of travel guide and darkly comic novel, at times reminiscent of an older 1930s or 40s comic novel We follow the main character through his walking guide, almost a book within the book, but one that very often diverges into the personal relationships and trials of his life, most notably with his often absent wife And from these snippets a story arc reveals itself, and shows a man dealing with the potential loss of his home to a planned bypass, and the potential breakdown of his second marriage to a woman it is clear from the outset is only interested in herself This is a novel that grows on you and gets better the further in you read, definately worth a go if you find a copy at your local charity shop Pub Walks in Underhill Country is based on a wonderful comic conceit Just the idea of it made me smile I have rarely tapped the Purchase button with such expectation of pleasure What makes the idea lovely is that almost all walking books and there are many seem to have a hidden text the story of the walker Why is he walking The walker is invariably male, and Anglo What is he walking from A love of walking and of nature often seems to be associated with a discomfort with the r Pub Walks in Underhill Country is based on a wonderful comic conceit Just the idea of it made me smile I have rarely tapped the Purchase button with such expectation of pleasure What makes the idea lovely is that almost all walking books and there are many seem to have a hidden text the story of the walker Why is he walking The walker is invariably male, and Anglo What is he walking from A love of walking and of nature often seems to be associated with a discomfort with the rest of life This book comically teases out the under text, allowing it to poke embarrassingly through its gentle and witty parody of nature writing It owes a little, perhaps, to John Lanchester s The Debt to Pleasure also a debut novel , which used cooking rather than walking as its metaphor, but is really all its own A bonus is that the nature writing is very enjoyable on its own terms, despite its Pooterish qualities By the way, by googling the route of the first walk, I discovered a rather remarkable walker s website and blog which could well have been an inspiration for the main character Join Graham Underhill as he takes you on walks in the West Midlands This is Grahams guide to rambling with information on the pubs along the way thrown in.This is an account of Graham and his second wife Sunita s life told in fifteen rambles.I found this novel to be a bit of a slow burner but it was very funny in parts. A funny and cleverly written book that brilliantly portrays its central character a knowledgable but pedantic local government officer with convincing accuracy The story starts with prosaic country walks and becomes increasingly bizarre as the protagonist s wife realises how boring her husband is and starts to look for entertainment elsewhere Although her husband s faithfulness and refusal to recognise her errant behaviour seem extreme,in fact it is not difficult to identify with his touch A funny and cleverly written book that brilliantly portrays its central character a knowledgable but pedantic local government officer with convincing accuracy The story starts with prosaic country walks and becomes increasingly bizarre as the protagonist s wife realises how boring her husband is and starts to look for entertainment elsewhere Although her husband s faithfulness and refusal to recognise her errant behaviour seem extreme,in fact it is not difficult to identify with his touching naivety and faithfulness, even when the pub walks extend to India and even Antarctica An unusual and funny book light reading, but certainly entertaining It will be interesting to see what this first novelist writes next Nat Segnit frames his debut novel as a walking guide by one Graham Underhill, a guide notable for the extent to which its fictional author s personal life intrudes on the text In the very first chapter ramble, we learn how Underhill met his second wife, Sunita Bhattacahrya fifteen years his junior at Malvern Library, where he gallantly offered to pay her overdue fines and so it continues As the novel progresses, we discover under just how much strain the couple s marriage was not that G Nat Segnit frames his debut novel as a walking guide by one Graham Underhill, a guide notable for the extent to which its fictional author s personal life intrudes on the text In the very first chapter ramble, we learn how Underhill met his second wife, Sunita Bhattacahrya fifteen years his junior at Malvern Library, where he gallantly offered to pay her overdue fines and so it continues As the novel progresses, we discover under just how much strain the couple s marriage was not that Graham seemed to notice until eventually Sunita goes missing, and the rambler turns searcher, setting out to look for her.The voice of Graham Underhill as revealed in his guides is well meaning but overly earnest and long winded, with a tendency to digress into a personal anecdote or some less than relevant piece of trivia one soon begins to see why Sunita might have begun to tire of him Much of the humour in Segnit s book comes from the incongruous juxtaposition of the rambler s guide and novelistic idioms, and Graham s apparent inability to take a hint even as early as the second chapter, when Sunita announces, I ve had enough, there s an undercurrent which suggests she is not just talking about this particular ramble yet Graham can t see this or any of the other signs which become increasingly plain to the reader.Amusing as all this is, it would wear pretty thin over the course of an entire novel if that were all there was to it particularly as it s intrinsic to the book s affect that Graham s narration tries one s patience at times but what carries Pub Walks in Underhill Country home for me is how Segnit uses its very structure as a means of characterisation Graham s framing of episodes from his life as walking routes can be seen as his attempt to impose order on the world this is Underhill country , after all, and rambling is the fulcrum of his life As the pages turn by and the life Graham knows falls apart, his insistence on retaining the stylistic conventions he has established the maps, the trivia, noting the character and strength of every beer he samples along the way stops feeling like an amusing joke and starts to seem increasingly desperate, the action of a man grasping for any kind of stability Still, in later chapters, Graham s narration becomesandstraightforwardly novelistic his control of the world slips by the end, the distinction between life and pub walk comes to the verge of collapsing altogether, with the result thatWell, it depends on what kind of man Graham Underhill is He comes across as a bumbling, rather naive, ultimately rather tragic figure but then again, our impression of Graham is filtered through both his subjectivity and the structures of the rambling guide format There are enough hints peppered throughout that weren t not seeing everything of the real Underhill, and that a darker interpretation of the novel might be valid Pub Walks in Underhill Country could have been too one note and gimmicky, but touches like that ambiguity transform it into something far richer.Yet Pub Walks isthan a fine read it s also an intriguing start to a literary career, because it makes one excited to read whatever Segnit writes next, whilst leaving a sense that he could go in just about any direction Start reading him now, I d say `Ebook ☙ Pub Walks In Underhill Country ⇰ If your companion is walking far ahead, it can be fun to close one eye and hold her between your thumb and forefinger, taking care in case she slips from your grasp, or, conversely, you crush her altogether Graham Underhill is a much loved local watercolourist, ale enthusiast, and self published guidebook writer the Wainwright of the West Midlands But our narrator and guide is a rambler in ways than one, and what begins as a set of walk instructions soon gives way to what Graham would rather talk about mostly, his marriage to the beautiful and erudite SunitaWhen a well connected environmentalist and would be MP takes an interest in Sunita s childhood memoir Graham s happiness seems complete Or it would, were it not for the shoddy state of the local footpath network And inconsiderate mountain bikers Litter louts, pretentious landscape photographers, idiots who consider light trainers suitable for mountainous terrain, and the Highways Agency s plan to build a bypass through his houseAt least he has his beloved Sunita Or does he Graham, it turns out, is not always the most reliable guide And neither is Underhill Country the sleepy idyll it seemsCunning, hilarious and heartbreaking, Nat Segnit s debut novel is a guidebook to stubborn optimism in the face of marital and environmental meltdown